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FOOD FIRST - August 2016 - Kansas City

The Standards: Old-Time "Gatorade"

By Bethany Klug

 

What I call "the hot heat," that is, triple digit heat indices, arrived early this year and continues as I write this edition of Food First! Getting in and out of a hot automobile or even the walk from the car to your destination can dehydrate you quickly. Fatigue, body aches, brain fog, headache, and hard stools are just a few of the symptoms of mild dehydration that can easily be dismissed as due to some other cause. I can't emphasize enough the importance of attention to hydration this time of year.

 

The key to proper hydration is to drink water and plenty of it. Clear, light-colored urine is one indicator of adequate hydration. Sweating, no matter how unseemly, is another. Sports drinks are not a substitute for water. They are high in salt and sugar which make them dehydrating, not rehydrating. Yes, I said dehydrating, not rehydrating. Sodas and sweet drinks, even artificially sweetened ones, are dehydrating too.

 

Yet, there is some merit in trying to replace minerals depleted by sweating in this kind of heat. This can be accomplished by eating dark, leafy greens, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, and other juicy vegetables, or drinking them freshly squeezed. Some people enjoy coconut water, but I suggest using it with care due to its sweetness. Then there is Switchel, also known as Harvest Drink, Harvest Beer, Swanky, and Haymakers Punch. Historically, it hydrated farmers working their fields on hot days. The earliest written reference to this hydrating and immune boosting drink goes back to 1789. Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote about Switchel in her “Little House” books. Switchel is made with ginger, a sweetener, apple cider vinegar, and water. I first learned about Switchel on a trip to New Hampshire where it is made with maple syrup. I found other recipes made with honey and molasses. The sweetener likely varied depending on the region of the country. Ginger is rich in minerals and immune boosting phytonutrients. Apple cider vinegar alkalizes the body helping all body functions work better. Dehydration acidifies the body.

 

There are so many versions of Switchel. Some are cooked. Others allow the ginger to infuse overnight. Not wanting to heat up the kitchen or wait on an infusion, I make mine with fresh ginger juice. Hubby swears small diameter ginger is hotter than fat ginger, so we adjust the amount accordingly.

 

Switchel

2-inch piece of fresh ginger

2 TBSP apple cider vinegar with the mother

3 TBSP local honey

4 cups water

 

Juice the ginger. Alternately, grate it or chop very fine. Combine with other ingredients in a pitcher or half-gallon mason jar. If using grated ginger, place mixture in refrigerator overnight to infuse. Optionally, strain the infusion before serving to remove the grated ginger. Otherwise, pour into half-pint mason jars for old-time ambience and enjoy.

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HealthSpan, the holistic medicine practice of Dr. Bethany Klug, is offering some excellent classes this summer to help you reduce your toxic load and add some quick, easy and delicious dishes to you weekly repertoire. Learn more at www.HealthSpanKC.com

 

 

Bethany Klug, DO created HealthSpan out of a deep wish: for everyone to experience vibrant health. We go beyond the conventional pill-for an-ill approach to educate and inspire you so you can successfully make positive steps toward greater health and wellbeing. Learn more at www.healthspankc.com or 913-642-1900.

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